Life is a journey — you don’t have to go yours alone. My personal journey has been formed both by years of experience coaching people at the individual and corporation level, as well as reflection on childhood experiences that shape how we behave as adults at work. Read on to learn about the ways I have carved out a place for greater freedom and impact in my own life and the ways I can help you do the same.

Professional Background

I have held strategic roles in health and wellness divisions at Merrill Lynch/BofA and Optum @ Goldman Sachs.  I designed and implemented the first Americas resilience strategy at Goldman Sachs, then created and launched a resiliency coaching program for their U.S. employees.  My work developing and leading Mindfulness classes at Goldman was featured in Fortune and Bloomberg magazines.

As a senior leader at Managed Health Network and Magellan Behavioral Health, I had profit and loss responsibility for large regional clinical and call centers, one of which won Magellan’s company-wide Distinguished Service Center of the Year.

In management consulting roles, I have coached executives and middle managers grappling with growth and contraction cycles, leadership challenges, and strategic and political pressures in high- performance environments.  As a strategic coach, I have focused primarily on high-performing individuals who are navigating complex strategic and interpersonal issues at work and/or are recovering from addiction.


Coaching practices help manage your energy

I now dedicate my time customizing coaching and educational strategies for corporations, groups and individuals.  Grounded in neuroscience and scientific research, these practices increase self-awareness, enhance focus and concentration, enable greater perspective, generate more thoughtful decision-making, and provide pleasure and fun as more energy is directed towards things that matter.

I have provided strategic coaching and delivered hundreds of psychoeducation seminars in diverse corporations and industries

These include Dow Jones, U.S. Army, U.S. Coast Guard, Coach, Dunkin Donuts, Merrill Lynch/BofA, Towers Watson, B.F. Goodrich, Coca Cola, Citi, Deloitte, PwC, Lever Brothers/Unilever, Citi, Ernst and Young, Raytheon, The New York Times, Young and Rubicam, The Clinton Foundation, National Hockey League, Alcoa, Oracle, Columbia University, Bloomberg, Victim Services Agency, and Aetna.

Publications: a remedial work skills training program and a companion video called “Working It Out,” published by the Adult Children of Alcoholics Foundation.

Training & Education

I hold a BA from Sarah Lawrence College and an MSW from Hunter College School of Social Work. I received performance coaching training in London from Sir John Whitmore’s consulting and training group. Tim Gallwey, creator of the “Inner Game” coaching brand has been a teacher and a strong influence on how to pay attention both to internal self-talk and external realities.

Licenses: Clinical Social Work with a specialty in chemincal dependence and adult children of alcoholics.

Certifications: International Coaching Federation Associate Coach; Clinical Imagery and Meditation and Transpersonal Coaching certifications; Certified Employee Assistance Professional, Certified trainer in Mental Health First Aid.

Personal History

I am an avid researcher, change agent, and seeker who has spent thousands of hours in high performance environments raising awareness and connecting the dots between behavioral health, employee well-being, and work systems.

If I learned anything in the world of work, it is that if you don’t know what something is, what it is that you’re dealing with, it impossible to address it skillfully, much less change it. Some of us just try to beat problems, or other people, into submission. I suspect that others of us learned in our families that certain things cannot “noticed” or commented upon because someone will get mad or hurt. The consequences of “seeing” and “saying” might be difficult enough that not knowing what you actually know, and avoiding conflict, seems to be a safer and better strategy, particularly at work. The focus on protecting our reputation and employment then trumps creative thinking and problem-solving, and place us in frustrated “stuckness.”

In my experience, the only way out is to tell the truth about our experience: get it out of our heads and into the light and air with trusted mentors and supportive others. Only then is it possible to get perspective and challenge deeply held, often unconscious assumptions that hold us, and everybody else back. Inevitably, new possibilities will emerge. And from there, greater freedom of self-expression for a greater good.

This method is practical and achievable. Meditation and visualization are excellent tools for increasing awareness and reflection. These tools are the ground of my practice.

If I learned anything in the world of work, it is that if you don’t know what something is, what it is that you’re dealing with, it impossible to address it skillfully, much less change it. Some of us just try to beat problems, or other people, into submission. I suspect that others of us learned in our families that certain things cannot “noticed” or commented upon because someone will get mad or hurt. The consequences of “seeing” and “saying” might be difficult enough that not knowing what you actually know, and avoiding conflict, seems to be a safer and better strategy, particularly at work. The focus on protecting our reputation and employment then trumps creative thinking and problem-solving, and place us in frustrated “stuckness.”

Are you ready to craft a meaningful life?

Get in touch and I’ll reach out to you to start a conversation.